Press

DON KIMES: THE WASHINGTON POST REVIEW

The Washington Post reviews Don Kime’s solo exhibition ,O, at Sense Gallery, Washington DC. The show runs through December 8, 2019.

“There are few recognizable images of living things in O, Don Kimes’s show at Sense Gallery, but the very format of the collage-paintings embraces the natural world. ‘I realized that life is not a series of straight lines, rectangles and right angles,’ the artist says in a brief statement. So all of these layered, mostly abstract pictures are in the shape of ovals.”

Sense Gallery
3111 Georgia Ave NW
Washington, DC 20010

EXTERNAL LINK

ALFONSO OLIVA: LE OPERE DI OLIVA ESPOSTE A NEW YORK

“Il Messaggerio.it” mentions Alfonso Oliva’s solo exhibition Algorithmic Visions: A Data Driven Interactive Exploration in September 2019 at the gallery.

Translation:

“Tomorrow is the last day to see Alfonso Oliva solo show in NY, the engineer graduated at the University of Cassino and awarded amongst top 10 in the USA. After the success of the installation titled “Momento” presented during Art Basel Miami, the gallery Denise Bibro Fine Art decides to launch a solo show of Oliva’s works in New York. Opened on September 19 and up until tomorrow consists in works from 2017 to 2019, the show is titles “Algorithmic Visions” and is in the Art District of New York, Chelsea. “The works on show” says Oliva “are interactive prints that can be activated via an augmented reality app that I developed as part of the experience, interactive installations, 3D printed sculptures in composite Iron material, CNC wood panels, laser cut prints and interactive rust paintings.” Oliva was born and raised in Cassino, holds a MS in Civil Engineering from UNICAS, an MS in Structural Engineering from NYU, a MS in Computational Design from Stevens Institute of Technology. The young multiawarded Engineer that lives in NY since 2009 has a dream to realize a sculpture to his hometown.”

Alfonso_Oliva_Il_Messaggero

NEON PHOTOGRAPHY: NY1 FEATURE STORY- NEW VISIONS: ACTIVISM THROUGH THE LENS

NY1 featured our September exhibition “New Visions: Activism Through the Lens.” This exhibition was in collaboration with Seeing for Ourselves and the Department of Probation’s (DOP’s) Neighborhood Opportunity Network (NeON) photography program.

 

EXTERNAL LINK

CAROL JACOBSEN: BRONXARTSPACE’S “SYSTEM OF INJUSTICE” WALKS DOWN THE HALLS OF AMERICA’S RACIST HISTORY

The Fordham Ram‘s addresses the racism that is connected through fashion, gender, education, and the business industry. The article features Carol Jacobsen, alongside other artists in the exhibition at BronxArtSpace’s System of Injustice. Jacobsen’s work show images of women that were sentence to life in prison.

The exhibition runs August 7- September 14, 2019
BronxArtSpace
305 E 140th St, The Bronx, NY 10454
(718) 401-8144

EXTERNAL LINK

DON PERLIS: CORRINE’S PICKS (INTERVIEW)

Corinne Basabe from Public Access Television, Long Island, interviews Don Perlis about his work and life as an artist.

*There are 5 videos

EXTERNAL LINK

JOHN HREHOV: CLEVELAND INSTITUTE OF ART ALUMNI SHOW

John Hrehov is featured in an article about Cleveland’s Institute of Art Alumni Show.

Image: John Hrehov, In Between, 2018. Oil on linen, 24 x 30 inches

EXTERNAL LINK

DUSTY BOYNTON: EXPOSED

Stowe Today features Dusty Boynton’s relief work at the Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, VT in the exhibition entitled “Exposed,” running through October 31, 2019.

Image: Dusty Boynton, Gaggle, 2011-12. Structured relief, 35 x 34 inches

EXTERNAL LINK

THURSTON BELMER: FINE ART CONNOISSEUR

Fine Art Connoisseur featured Thurston Belmer’s solo exhibition “The Best of all Possible Worlds” in their May 1, 2019 print edition.

Image: Thurston Belmer, The Fakest of Flowers I, 2019. Oil on panel, 44 x 54 inches

LINK HERE

GEOFFREY STEIN: ABOVE THE LAW: RBG’S WORDS ARE A LITERAL WORK OF ART

Geoffrey Stein is showing the 30 x 30 inch-collage, R.B.G. 2019, at Denise Bibro Fine Art in New York City. Ginsburg’s 1996 opinion in United States v. Virginia, which struck down the male-only admissions policy at the Virginia Military Institute, is the material for the collage. Stein worked with acrylic and pencil on canvas.

Image: Geoffrey Stein, R.B.G, 2019. Collage material from U.S. v. Virginia (Virginia Military Institute case written by Justice Ginsburg) 518 U.S. 515 (1996), acrylic, and pencil on canvas, 30 x 30 inches

 

EXTERNAL LINK

FRANK HYDER: THE JANIS WATERCOLORS

Film maker John Thornton examines Frank Hyder’s work.

Artist Frank Hyder has a show at the Michener Art Museum through mid February 2019, called the Janis Project. Janis is one of several large inflatable sculptures that Frank has created and taken all over the world. this film I examine the watercolors that are an integral art of Frank’s art project.

 

EXTERNAL LINK

DON PERLIS: TOMATO MEDIA GROUP

Thank you Tomato Group Media for stopping by the Gallery when Don Perlis’ solo exhibition Me Too was on view to interview Don and Denise.

They speak about the the changing city, and how it is effecting art, artists, and real estate.

*Clip starts at 10:30

LINK HERE

ELAINE CLAYMAN: ART FROM THE BOROS VI

Thank you Elaine Clayman for this amazing video of the Art From the Boros VI reception, and you very kind words about the gallery.

We are so pleased to show such amazing and hidden local talent at the gallery in our annual Boros Show.

Art From the Boros VI runs through February 2, 2019.

LINK HERE

DON PERLIS: IL GIORNALE DELL’ARTE

Italian art journals review of Don Perlis’ solo exhibition TrumpWorld at Firecat Projects in Chicago, IL.

Translation by Stanley Grand:
“Don Perlis (born 1941 Bronx, lives and works in New York) has given the title of its most important painting, “Trumpworld”, to his solo show at the Firecat Gallery in Chicago. Naturally, it has caused discussions on the subject.
Bereft of conventions, as had been the Buddhas, the Madonnas, the Avant-gardes, even the Isms of the recent past, to support their gaze, the spectators of our time are desperately striving to hang onto some motif, any motif to look at visual art. But visual art retains the privilege of being visual, that is, of transcending its subject, whether it is a technical or a literary or political theme or something else. It either transcends it or it drowns in the swamp of no infamy and no praise like most of us artists of the competent yawn. Today’s spectator has the fortune, unique in history, to be able to look at art without external guides but this fills him with fear.
Many artists respond to this situation by feeding the audience’s desire for support: despite the risks, they sometimes explain with theoretical descriptions how one should to look at their work, other times they even cage their images inside narratives woven into the works. It is the case of “Trumpworld”. To entitle a painting after the name and image of Trump, to place his image grandly at the center of the composition, means to draw attention to periodic news at the expense of the rich wonders of painting.
Perlis is a painter in the strong tradition of American social realism. His work is a relaunch of the Ashcan School of painting that flourished in the first half of the twentieth century, especially on the east coast of the continent. He went to study the great late nineteenth century Thomas Eakins, spent countless hours in museums and European churches learning from their immense vocabulary of forms and symbols, shadows, lights, body and transparencies. He then took the baggage of observations he has harvested and translates it into these paintings of his, that mythicize the common life of the American cauldron. The flying angels of Tintoretto or the Carracci become rap dancers who acrobatize in the subway cars, the crowdings of Bosch morph into Times Square: Batman next to the red teddy bear, a policeman who seems to come out of the illustrations of Norman Rockwell, dressed men who titillate or watch naked women, the nudistas, the long and dry Uncle Sam walking on stilts dressed in the US flag, the tourists, voyeurs unaware of their being not people but consumer products. But what attracts someone like me to the point of writing about it? Perlis is not a cold schemer, he works with passion in a petty artworld that can not but ignore him; unlike the past models he has chosen, his painting is not pleasant but is powerful, it’s subtle but also physical, full of pentimento – the Renaissance definition of when the painter changes his mind but lets the visible record of such change be seen; instead of applying refined glazes he throws himself into adding brushstrokes where they are needed without regard to the rules. Despite the anecdotal themes, his is painting that transcends them.”

Image: Don Perlis, Me Too, study, 2018. Oil on canvas, 11.5 x 9.5 inches

LINK HERE

FRANK HYDER: The Janis Project, a Quixotic Tale

Artist Frank Hyder gives a spellbinding lecture at the James A. Michener Art Museum about his Janis Project in which he creates inflatable sculprtures and then temporarily installs them in cities all over the world.

Image: Frank Hyder, Janis Flotilla, 2018. Acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

LINK HERE

DON PERLIS: 3CR THE THIRD COAST REVIEW: TRUMPWORLD

Review: Trumpworld Artist Don Perlis Channels the Theater of Times Square and Current America

“The whole body of Perlis’ work addresses other sides of New York City life–particularly his paintings of subway performers putting on circus-like performances on the handles and poles as the train cars speed through the tunnels. But even as New York City permeates Perlis’ work, it still possesses a universal urban mood that shows the need for entertainment in times of struggle and within a tiring metropolitan life. This is the artist’s first exhibition in Chicago and he hopes it will not be the last. Here’s hoping his characters return again soon to the Windy City.”

Image: Don Perlis, Sphinx, 2017. Oil on canvas, 21 x 26.5 inches

 

LINK HERE

FRANK HYDER: JANIS JOURNEY AT THE MICHENER MUSEUM

The Morning Call reviews Frank Hyder’s exhibition at the Michener Museum, Doylestown, PA.

“In your face: Inflatable head sculptures at Michener Museum make bold statements about humanity”

LINK HERE

AMIR HARIRI: PANK MAGAZINE

A conversation with Amir Hariri

LINK HERE

SUI PARK : THE CHAUTAUQUAN DAILY

The Chautauquan Daily wrote about Parks work.

“New York-based Sui Park, who has a background in both fiber arts and interior architecture, has crafted intricate structures from the most modest of materials. “Mostly Cloudy” is a series of hanging, three-dimensional oval shapes that are reminiscent of both clouds and amoebas. From a distance, they look as though they may be formed from glass or resin, but closer inspection reveals that they are made from thousands of zip ties, linked together in loops to create three-dimensional forms. The object themselves are stunning, but just as intriguing are the shadows they create on the wall behind them”

LINK HERE

PAULA ELLIOT: ARTCRITICAL

Paula Elliot was featured on ArtCritical by Senior Editor, David Cohen:

“This is the last week to catch Elliot’s show of works on paper at Denise Bibro. Containment and release are the dueling protagonists in the quiet drama of these gently seething mixed media works on paper. Bulbous, pulsating, billowing calligraphs of charcoal and pastel seem either to emanate from, or miraculously support, clean-edged vessels or platforms, often in sharper, chirpier palette than the complementary sooty emissions. In any event, the genie is out of the bottle.”

Image: Paul Elliott, The Thing is Suite 1 #3, 2012. Charcoal, pencil, pastel, and acrylic on paper, 40 x 32 inches

LINK HERE

MARK HADJIPATERAS : CULTURE NOW

Online platform Culture Now reviews “Natural Habitat”

LINK HERE

MARK HADJIPATERAS : INTERNATIONAL SCULPTURE CENTER

International Sculpture Center reviews Mark Hadjipateras’s solo exhibition at the Gallery.

LINK HERE

ARTE FUSE: DISTANCE AVAILS NOT

“Distance Avails Not” : Art from the Boros IV at Denise Bibro Fine Art by Eileen G’Sell

LINK HERE

DON KIMS: THE CHAUTAUQUAN DAILY

Review: Punching upward to move forward

LINK HERE